KHQ Today

KHQ Today

Voting Must Follow Petition and Assembly

According+to+the+Pew+Research+Center%2C+Millennials+accounted+for+27%25+of+the+eligible+voting+population+in+the+States.
According to the Pew Research Center, Millennials accounted for 27% of the eligible voting population in the States.

According to the Pew Research Center, Millennials accounted for 27% of the eligible voting population in the States.

According to the Pew Research Center, Millennials accounted for 27% of the eligible voting population in the States.

Diana Dudenhoeffer, News Editor

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Across the nation, people are waving banners, holding signs and pushing for legislation.  We’re exercising our rights to petition and assemble, but lost in the passion of protest is one of the most important liberties of a free democracy: the right to vote.

  1 in 5 Americans participated in protests of some sort since the last presidential election, according to the Washington Post.

   It is admirable that all of us are taking stances, whatever they may be, in order to create a nation that we’re proud to be a part of.  And it becomes especially admirable when we consider that so many young people are taking part in demonstrations, both locally and nationally.

    There’s a misconception about young people voting. Many believe that Millennials (those born from the early eighties to the late nineties) do not vote, but that is untrue. Statistics from the 2016 presidential election, according to the Pew Research Center, found that 62 million Millennials voted.  Compare that to the 57 million Gen-Xers who also voted, and it’s easy to see that Millennials are certainly putting to use their right to vote.

   Most of the students in high school currently are in Generation Z (those born after the late nineties).  It is incredibly important that Gen Z keeps up the same momentum with political involvement, especially by voting, because it is one of the most important rights that Americans have. And all of this political involvement becomes meaningless if we do not translate that same energy into voting

   In order to register to vote, go to the Missouri Secretary of State’s website (sos.mo.gov) and go to the Elections and Voting tab.

   Registrars must fill out the voter registration application, print and mail the application (the application already has the mailing address to the county clerk’s office on the page).

   Those registering must be 17 ½ to register and 18 by the day you go to the polls. The only requirements are that you must be a Missouri resident and a United States citizen.

   July 11, 2018 is the last day to register to vote for the primary election for Missouri.  The primary election allows people to vote for those who they think should be in the running for the general election, where voters will choose all or most members of the political body.  The third Wednesday before the election is the deadline to register in order to participate.
   Polling places are open from 6AM to 7PM; if you are in line at 7PM, you still have the right to cast your vote.

   It is important to be informed about voting rights, how to register to vote and to go to the polls so that those representing the public can act with its people’s best interests in mind.

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Voting Must Follow Petition and Assembly